Tag Archives: Fly Fisherman

Fly Fishing for Steelhead

Fly fishing for steelhead fish can be a challenging and rewarding experience. These amazing fish share their heritage with the Atlantic and Pacific salmon. Although they are native to the West Coast of the United States as well as in Russia, they can also be found in the tributaries of the Great Lakes. This is because they were planted in the lakes many times in the 1800’s.

There are numerous places you can go when fly fishing for steelhead. As we’ve already said, they are most plentiful in the Western United States. You can find plenty of steelhead in the rivers of Northern California, Oregon, and Washington state.

Steelhead are cousins of the rainbow trout and have a decidedly chrome-like coloring. They are amazingly acrobatic and can provide any fly fisherman with a fulfilling challenge when trying to catch them.

Most of the fly fishing techniques used to catch steelhead are based on those historically developed to catch Atlantic salmon. Flies are cast downstream from the angler on a floating or sinking line. The take, which can sometimes be quite violent, usually occurs towards the end of the swing. You can also use nymphing methods usually used by trout anglers.

Winter steelheads are often considered the “hard core” of fly fishers, sometimes enduring hours of repeated casting in cold water and freezing conditions for that one tug that can occur when you least expect it. Many fly fishers will spend a lot of time trying to land that prized steelhead only to be frustrated near the end.

The main thing to keep in mind when fishing for steelhead is to practice a lot of patience. For people who fly fish for steelhead regularly, the success of a day consists of one good hook. You will not see big numbers of catches like you will on trout rivers. Keep a positive attitude and watch what the fish are doing.

Most steelhead pockets are found downstream, but other anglers know this as well. Steelhead are most plentiful in the cold, winter months, but you can often find several other fly fishers trying to fish the same spot in hopes of landing their fish. As you can imagine, this is not especially good for the fish or the fisherman. Practice appropriate etiquette when on the river fly fishing for steelhead.

You will probably need a 9 foot single hand rod or a 12-15 foot double handed rod for best results. Line weights should range from 7 to 9. The best flies to use when trying to land a steelhead include the Wooly Bugger, the Conehead Zuddler, and the Black Bear Green Butt.

Fly fishing for steelhead can be an amazingly gratifying experience when you are patient and wise when it comes to the natural patterns of these fish. When you are able to land one, you will be surprised at how much fun it is to reel it in!

Steve has been fishing for many years. There is nothing he likes better than spending a few hours on the side of a river or lake trying to catch the ultimate fish. He has travelled extensively throughout the world and never lets an opportunity go by to try out the local fishing. He has written a book on the subject of Fly Fishing which can be purchased at http://fishing.articleland.co.uk . He can also be reached for further information at his website http://www.articleland.co.uk

Fly Fishing Equipment: What You Need for Success

Fly fisherman have tackle boxes and closets dedicated to their equipment. And while a person can list dozens of ?necessities? for a fishing trip, a fisherman really only needs a few essentials.


Obviously, everyone needs a fly rod if he plans on fly fishing. A good rod will be anywhere from 6 to 10 feet long. New fisherman should note that no other piece of equipment is more important than this rod, so if you have a liberal budget, give this road financial priority.


Ironically, while some will tell you that you cannot fish without a reel, you can. Many a successful fly fisherman has landed a nice fish without the mess of a reel. He just knows how to move his line. A reel does come in handy, though, for those seeking out the larger fish. This is especially important to warm water and saltwater fisherman.


Fly line comes in a variety of strengths but in a standard length. You will usually find it in 90 foot lengths but with weights depending on the pounds you are planning on landing. Fishermen rate their line according to grain, with 7000 grains equaling one pound. You can cast a heavier line farther and obviously land bigger fish, so this works best for those windy days. Lighter line obviously costs less and can work well on calm days when searching for smaller fish. You can even buy line in two styles: level and tapered.


Fishermen searching for Moby Dick utilize backing: an extra line that will give you more than the desired 90 feet of line. Though some might tell you that you really dont need this extra line, one reel will cost you only a few bucks, and it gives fishermen the security of knowing that if they do catch a big fish, they can land him with ease thanks to their extra line.


To affix your fly to your line, you will need a leader: a piece of transparent material that attaches to both elements. The leader will be as short as 6 feet and as long as 15 feet, just depending on what youre looking for. They have ratings based on a variety of things, from the diameter of the line, to the lines breaking point, to different business classifications.


Finally, no one can fly fish without a fly. Flies are basically artificial bait for the fish. Though no fly is alive or ever was, a good fly fisherman tries to either create or pick a fly that looks alive, because no fish wants to eat a dead bug. Flies will range in style from mimicking frogs to shrimp. Creative fly fishermen create their own flies from scratch using felt, wire, and even feathers.


So we can see that really no one needs a big closet for his fly fishing materials. In the end, fly fishing shouldnt take over the whole house but should still make its owner smile.

Resources of fly fishing can be found at: www.excitingflyfishing.comand here

Fly Fishing Accessories – A Few Ideas To Make The Sport More Exciting

Fly fishing is a sport that has emerged over the years and has taken on a form of a science and an art. In addition to the right equipment you must have the proper knowledge if you want to be successful in this sport. You are expected to have the proper outfit that includes all the gear needed for a fly fishing trip. This includes the clothing, foot wear, fishing rod and tackle and most of all the knowledge of he habits of the fish you are angling to catch.

The basic wardrobe of a fly fisherman is the fly fishing vest that contains a lot of pockets that is used for the various tools and tackle an angler needs to catch his trophy fish. A small pocket made out of tanned sheep skin and worn in the front of the vest is a good accessory for keeping those additional flies and hooks. Another good accessory that most fishermen like to keep handy is a spring loaded spool that has a pair of nail clippers hooked at the end. This is handy when you have ot cut the line and either remove the catch or let it go.

The fly fishing vest should also have a big pocket at the back where you can tuck in some light rain gear just in case. A small ring at the back of the collar of the vest will come handy to keep the net out of the way.

Fly Boxes should be wisely chosen. These should be small enough to tuck away in one of the pockets. Ideally a fly box should have 2 to 3 chambers to keep the different flies and tackle. The sections in the fly box keep the wet flies and the dry flies separate. Some small vials are also pretty handy to store the wet flies after a catch.

It is important to keep a spare spool complete with reel just in case the one on the rod gets spoilt. You never know when it will and it is best to have one spare handy instead of abandoning a perfectly good fishing trip.

If you are planning a fly fishing trip into a thickly vegetated area such as a swamp you are best advised to keep some insect repellant as well as some rash cream handy with your kit. Insect bites and allergic rashes are common fishing trips.

Equally important for the fly fishing kit are sun goggles, gloves, a flash light and small pocket knife and don’t forget the first aid kit. Last but not the least is the wading boots. These are usually hip length leather or rubber boots. Care must be taken not to wade deeper than the length of the boots for obvious reasons.

With the right accessories, you can have the fishing experience of a lifetime.

Abhishek is an avid Fly Fishing enthusiast and he has got some great Fly Fishing Secrets up his sleeve! Download his FREE 93 Pages Ebook, “How To Become A Fly Fishing Pro” from his website http://www.Fishing-Masters.com/95/index.htm . Only limited Free Copies available.